Wednesday, March 2, 2011

Fortunate Sons: The 120 Chinese Boys Who Came to America, Went to School, and Revolutionized an Ancient Civilization




Fortunate Sons: The 120 Chinese Boys Who Came to America, Went to School, and Revolutionized an Ancient Civilization


Liel Leibovitz, Matthew Miller 



  • Hardcover: 320 pages

  • Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company (February 14, 2011)

  • Language: English

  • ISBN-10: 0393070042

  • ISBN-13: 978-0393070040


  • Hardcover: 320 pages




  • About Fortunate Sons: The 120 Chinese Boys Who Came to America, Went to School, and Revolutionized an American Civilization by Liel Leibovitz and Matthew Miller

    In 1872, the Chinese Education Mission sent 120 boys—most no older than 12 or 13—away from their homes in Canton China to the United States. Here, they were sent to private schools, given room and board with prominent families, and told that they would learn all that the West had to offer. They met some of the brightest American luminaries of the time, from Ulysses S. Grant to Mark Twain. After spending a decade in New England’s finest schools, the boys returned home driven by a pioneering spirit of progress and reform. Their lives in America influenced not only their thinking, but their nation’s endeavor to become a contemporary world power, an endeavor that resonates powerfully today.

    Fortunate Sons tells these boys’ remarkable stories—their homesickness, their ambition, and the revolutionizing changes that they ultimately made to China upon their return. Liel Leibovitz and Matthew Miller draw on the unusual wealth of primary resources in order to let readers listen to the students’ own voices. Drawing on diaries, letters, and other first-person accounts, Fortunate Sons tells a remarkable tale, weaving together the dramas of personal lives with the momentous thrust of a nation reborn. These first-hand accounts lend Fortunate Sons its most remarkable feature: that its layered account of the relations between China and America at a pivotal moment in the last empire can build on vivid individual portraits of these men caught between two cultures. Shedding light on a crucial yet largely unknown period in China’s history, Fortunate Sons provides insight into the issues concerning that nation today, from its struggle toward economic supremacy to its fraught relationship with the United States.

    Liel Leibovitz and Matthew Miller are authors of Lili Marlene: The Soldiers’ Song of World War II.









  •  

  • Post a Comment

    wind follower

    wind follower